Funding History

External funding obtained as principal investigator or co-principal investigator

The University of Michigan

Funding obtained while at The University of Michigan

NASA Grant

Predictability of stationary and non-stationary internal tides in the US Navy global hydrodynamical model

  • Agency / Foundation: NASA Grant
  • Grant #: 80NSSC20K1135
  • Date: 06/04/2020 - 06/03/2024

Collaborators / Institutions: Hans Ngodock and Jay Shriver of NRL, Maarten Buijsman of USM, Innocent Souopgui of UNO, Eric Chassignet, Jim Richman, and Xiaobiao Xu of FSU, and Tom Haine of JHU.

Lead PI on award to University of Michigan, University of Southern Mississippi (USM), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), University of New Orleans (UNO), Johns Hopkins University (JHU), and Florida State University (FSU). SWOT stands for “Surface Water Ocean Topography”. It is a joint NASA/French space agency wide-swath satellite altimeter mission, with a planned launch in 2022. Project goal is to model the stationary and non-stationary internal tides on a global scale in a model that assimilates nadir and SWOT altimeter data.

 

Integrated coastal modeling

  • Agency / Foundation: Department of Energy
  • Grant #: DE-AC05-76RL01830
  • Date: 01/16/2020 - 09/30/2022

Collaborators / Institutions: Subcontract is part of a large project led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), that includes Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), another DOE lab, and multiple academic institutions. LANL collaborators include Drs. Phillip Wolfram, Andrew Roberts, and Nairita Pal. Lead project PI is Dr. Ian Kraucunas of PNNL.

Purpose of project is to predict flooding and other hazards for the US east coast over the next several decades. Our role is to help implement and validate tides in the DOE ocean model.

Office of Naval Research Grant

Modeling, characterizing, and predicting effects of internal gravity waves on acoustic propagation on basin to global scales

  • Agency / Foundation: Office of Naval Research Grant
  • Grant #: N00014-19-1-2712
  • Date: 09/16/2019 - 09/15/2022

Collaborators / Institutions: Project is made up of related grants at ARiA, Applied Ocean Sciences, Naval Research Laboratory, University of Southern Mississippi, and Florida State University. Project lead is Jason Summers of ARiA.

Purpose of project is to determine impacts of internal tides and gravity waves on basin-scale ocean acoustics.

NSF

Collaborative Research: Interactions between internal waves, mesoscale eddies, and submesoscale currents in the California Current system

  • Agency / Foundation: National Science Foundation Grant
  • Grant #: OCE-1851164
  • Date: 06/01/2019 - 05/31/2022

Collaborators / Institutions: Roy Barkan (project lead) and Jim McWilliams (UCLA), Maarten Buijsman (University of Southern Mississippi), Jay Shriver (NRL), and Jim Richman (Florida State University)

Purpose of grant is to investigate internal wave spectrum and internal wave-eddy interactions in coupled HYCOM-ROMS simulations of the California Current system.

Office of Naval Research Grant

Near-inertial waves in realistically forced HYCOM simulations with high-resolution atmospheric coupling

  • Agency / Foundation: Office of Naval Research Grant
  • Grant #: N00014-18-1-2544
  • Date: 06/01/2018 - 11/30/2020

Collaborators / Institutions: Maarten Buijsman (University of Southern Mississippi--project lead), Jay Shriver (Naval Research Laboratory), and James Richman (Florida State University).

Sole PI on ONR grant to University of Michigan. Related grant sent to collaborators above. Purpose is to investigate near-inertial waves in HYCOM.

Office of Naval Research Grant

Connecting global HYCOM to FLEAT

  • Agency / Foundation: Office of Naval Research Grant
  • Grant #: N00014-17-1-2958
  • Date: 09/01/2017 - 08/31/2019

Collaborators / Institutions: Sole PI on ONR grant.

The purpose of this grant is to connect results from global HYCOM simulations with in-line inserted topographic wave drag, to the FLEAT field program.

NASA Grant

Internal tides and waves in a high-resolution ocean general circulation model with data assimilation

  • Agency / Foundation: NASA Grant
  • Grant #: NNX17AH55G
  • Date: 06/01/2017 - 05/31/2021

Collaborators / Institutions: Lead PI on NASA grant. Collaborators are Hans Ngodock and Jay Shriver of NRL, Maarten Buijsman and Innocent Souopgui of the University of Southern Mississippi, Jim Richman of FSU, and Dimitris Menemenlis of NASA JPL.

This grant will support our work in mapping the global sea surface height signatures of stationary internal tides, non-stationary internal tides, and the supertidal internal gravity wave continuum. We hypothesize that our HYCOM simulations with simultaneous data assimilation acting on mesoscale eddies and an Augmented State Ensemble Kalman Filter (ASEnKF) will have some degree of skill in predicting the non-stationary internal tide signal.

NASA Grant

Modeling internal wave signals and their predictability for SWOT

  • Agency / Foundation: NASA Grant
  • Grant #: NNX16AH79G
  • Date: 04/01/2016 - 03/31/2020

Collaborators / Institutions: Hans Ngodock, Jim Richman, and Jay Shriver of NRL, Maarten Buijsman of USM, Eric Chassignet and Xiabiao Xu of FSU, Matthew Alford of Scripps, and James Girton and Zhongxiang Zhao of University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory.

Lead PI on award to University of Michigan, University of Southern Mississipi (USM), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Florida State University (FSU). Collaborators are Hans Ngodock, Jim Richman, and Jay Shriver of NRL, Maarten Buijsman of USM, Eric Chassignet and Xiabiao Xu of FSU, Matthew Alford of Scripps, and James Girton and Zhongxiang Zhao of University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory. SWOT stands for “Surface Water Ocean Topography”. It is a joint NASA/French space agency wide-swath satellite altimeter mission, with a planned launch in 2020. Project goal is to model the impact of internal tides and internal gravity waves for SWOT mission planning.

Office of Naval Research Grant

Improving global surface and internal tides through two-way coupling with high-resolution coastal models.

  • Agency / Foundation: Office of Naval Research Grant
  • Grant #: N00014-15-1-2288
  • Date: 04/01/2015 - 03/31/2018

Collaborators / Institutions: Maarten Buijsman (USM; lead PI), and Jim Richman, Jay Shriver, and Alan Wallcraft of Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)

Collaborators are Maarten Buijsman (USM; lead PI), and Jim Richman, Jay Shriver, and Alan Wallcraft of Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Project goal is to implement two-way nesting within HYCOM and to test whether high resolution of regions with strong resonant coastal tides improves the global tides within HYCOM.

NSF

Diagnosis of forced versus intrinsic low-frequency variability in high-resolution coupled climate models using geostrophic turbulence techniques.

  • Agency / Foundation: National Science Foundation Grant
  • Grant #: OCE-1351837
  • Date: 06/01/2014 - 05/31/2019

Collaborators / Institutions: Steve Griffies of NOAA GFDL, Thierry Penduff of LGGE-MEOM, Bill Dewar of Florida State University, Andrew Hogg of Australian National University, and Jeff Blundell of National Oceanography Centre Southampton

Sole PI on CAREER award to University of Michigan, 6/1/2014-5/31/2019. Dates include one-year no-cost extension. Collaborators are Steve Griffies of NOAA GFDL, Thierry Penduff of LGGE-MEOM, Bill Dewar of Florida State University, Andrew Hogg of Australian National University, and Jeff Blundell of National Oceanography Centre Southampton. Project goal is to utilize frequency spectra diagnostics, in conjunction with other techniques, to quantify the relative importance of forcing versus intrinsic nonlinear processes in the maintenance of low-frequency variability in coupled ocean-atmospheric climate models. Both realistic GFDL simulations, and idealized quasi-geostrophic simulations, will be analyzed for the project.

NASA Grant

Application of high-resolution global simulations of tides embedded within an eddying general circulation model to SWOT mission planning.

  • Agency / Foundation: NASA Grant
  • Grant #: NNX13AD95G
  • Date: 01/09/2013 - 01/08/2016

Collaborators / Institutions: Jim Richman and Jay Shriver at Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center

Lead-PI on award to University of Michigan, 1/9/2013-1/8/2016. Collaborators are Jim Richman and Jay Shriver at Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Project goal is to utilize high-resolution simulations with embedded tides to help in planning for SWOT wide-swath satellite altimeter mission.

Office of Naval Research Grant

Insertion, validation, and application of barotropic and baroclinic tides in 1/12 and 1/25 degree global HYCOM

  • Agency / Foundation: Office of Naval Research Grant
  • Grant #: N00014-11-1-0487
  • Date: 05/01/2011 - 04/30/2015

Collaborators / Institutions: Eric Chassignet of FSU, Maarten Buijsman, Joe Metzger, Jim Richman, Jay Shriver, and Alan Wallcraft at Naval Research Laboratory

Lead-PI on award to University of Michigan, 5/1/2011-4/30/2015. Key collaborators include Eric Chassignet of FSU and several scientists (including Maarten Buijsman, Joe Metzger, Jim Richman, Jay Shriver, and Alan Wallcraft) at Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Project goal is to continue insertion and validation of barotropic and baroclnic tides in high-resolution wind-driven HYCOM model used for Navy ocean forecasting purposes.

NSF

Collaborative Research: Representing internal-wave driven mixing in global ocean models

  • Agency / Foundation: National Science Foundation Grant
  • Grant #: OCE-0968783
  • Date: 06/01/2010 - 05/31/2016

Collaborators / Institutions: Jennifer MacKinnon (Scripps/UCSD)

Co-PI on multiple-institution project led by Jennifer MacKinnon (Scripps/UCSD), 6/1/2010-5/31/2016. Dates include two-year creativity extension for entire project, and one-year no-cost extension at U-Michigan. Project goal is to develop improved parameterizations of internal-wave driven mixing, implement such parameterizations in global high-resolution models, and implement resulting three-dimensional maps of internal wave driven energy dissipation and mixing into global ocean climate models. U-Michigan part will focus on middle step; simulations of global internal wave field (especially internal tides) at highest resolutions possible, utilizing parameterizations to be developed by others, and yielding three-dimensional maps of energy dissipation due to internal waves.

NSF

Collaborative Research: Impact of bottom boundary layer drag and topographic wave drag on the eddying general circulation

  • Agency / Foundation: National Science Foundation Grant
  • Grant #: OCE-0960820
  • Date: 06/01/2010 - 05/31/2015

Collaborators / Institutions: Eric Chassignet (FSU), Glenn Flierl (MIT), Steve Garner (GFDL), Steve Jayne (WHOI), Joe LaCasce (University of Oslo), Mat Maltrud (LANL), Rob Scott (UTexas)

Lead-PI on multiple-institution project, 6/1/2010-5/31/2015. Dates include one-year no-cost extension. Grant later supplemented by two REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) awards. Project goal is to examine impact of quadratic bottom boundary layer drag and topographic wave drag on the dynamics and energy budgets of the eddying general (low-frequency) oceanic circulation. Both realistic high resolution global models (such as HYCOM and POP), and more idealized models, will be utilized. Collaborators include Eric Chassignet (FSU), Glenn Flierl (MIT), Steve Garner (GFDL), Steve Jayne (WHOI), Joe LaCasce (University of Oslo), Mat Maltrud (LANL), Rob Scott (UTexas).

The University of Texas at Austin

Funding obtained while at The University of Texas at Austin

Office of Naval Research Grant

Effects of small-scale bathymetric roughness on the global internal wave field

  • Agency / Foundation: Office of Naval Research Grant
  • Grant #: 00014-07-1-0392 (N00014-09-1-1003 upon transfer to Florida State University)
  • Date: 03/23/2007

Collaborators / Institutions: John Goff (U-Texas), Patrick Timko, Walter Smith, Karen Marks

Co-PI on project led by John Goff (U-Texas). Three-year award starting March 23, 2007. Remaining funds transferred to Florida State University and expended there. Other collaborators: Patrick Timko, Walter Smith, Karen Marks. This project is a collaboration between marine geophysicists and physical oceanographers. The internal wave field, which is responsible for much of the mixing that occurs in the ocean, is generated in part by tidal and geostrophic flows over rough topography. Horizontal scales as small as a few kilometers are important in this wave generation process, yet are not resolved in global topographic datasets. Here we take advantage of the knowledge geophysicists have of the seafloor, to generate a synthetic bottom roughness which is correct in a statistical sense, and which contains adequate variance at small horizontal scales. We will test whether this augmented roughness increases the internal wave generation in global models.

NSF

Collaborative Research: Understanding tidal resonances in the present-day and ice-age oceans

  • Agency / Foundation: National Science Foundation Grant
  • Grant #: OCE-0623159 (OCE-0924481 upon transfer to Florida State University)
  • Date: 10/01/2006

Collaborators / Institutions: Samar Khatiwala of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (Columbia University), Patrick Cummins, Chris Garrett, Richard Karsten, Malte Muller, Pierre St-Laurent, Graig Sutherland, Doug MacAyeal, Glenn Milne, Jerry Mitrovica

Co-PI with Samar Khatiwala of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (Columbia University) on three-year award from National Science Foundation, starting October 1, 2006. Remaining funds transferred to Florida State University and expended there. Grant later supplemented by an REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) award. Other collaborators: Patrick Cummins, Chris Garrett, Richard Karsten, Malte Muller, Pierre St-Laurent, Graig Sutherland, Doug MacAyeal, Glenn Milne, Jerry Mitrovica. In this project we have used both analytical and numerical models to understand how factors such as the wavelength and frequency of the tidal astronomical forcing, and the depths and length scales of the open and coastal oceans, affect tidal resonance. Of particular interest is the coupling between shelf and open-ocean tides. We find in both our analytical and numerical models that removal of relatively small shelf regions can have a substantial and far-reaching effect on the open-ocean tide. This is relevant for understanding how the tides are impacted by changes in sea level. For instance, during the ice ages, sea level was much lower, and the area of continental shelves was consequently much reduced. We have found that the modeled tides during the ice age were quite different from what they are today. In particular, the tides in the ice-age Labrador Sea were much larger. This in turn has consequences for understanding Heinrich events, the large iceberg discharges that took place during the ice ages. Heinrich events originated primarily in the Labrador Sea, and we have hypothesized that the large modeled tides in the Labrador Sea may have played a role in the dynamics of these events. The hypothesis is motivated in part by the very substantial impacts of tides on ice streams and floating ice shelves that have been observed in present-day Antarctica.

Naval Research Laboratory

Embedding a forward model of barotropic and baroclinic tides into a high-resolution general circulation model

  • Agency / Foundation: Naval Research Laboratory Contract
  • Grant #: N000173-06-2-C003
  • Date: 09/01/2006

Collaborators / Institutions: Harley Hurlburt, Joseph Metzger, and Alan Wallcraft of Naval Research Laboratory, Patrick Timko and Eric Chassignet of Florida State University

Sole PI on contract from Naval Research Laboratory, starting September 1, 2006. Remaining funds transferred to Florida State University and expended there. Collaborators: Harley Hurlburt, Joseph Metzger, and Alan Wallcraft of Naval Research Laboratory, Patrick Timko and Eric Chassignet of Florida State University. Contract research laid groundwork for 2011 Office of Naval Research grant to U-Michigan as well as related $2.1M and $3.7M tide grants to Florida State University and Naval Research Laboratory.

Institutional funding, 2005-present

The University of Michigan

The University of Michigan

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan

Research support provided in the Associate Professor Support Fund, from the Margaret and Herman Sokol Faculty Awards.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan

Research support provided in start-up package for new faculty.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, The University of Michigan

Summer 2010 salary support provided for new faculty.

Florida State University

Florida State University

Office of Research, Florida State University

Research support provided in start-up package for new faculty.

First-Year Assistant Professor Program, Florida State University

Summer 2009 salary support provided for new faculty.

The University of Texas at Austin

The University of Texas at Austin

Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin

Research support provided in Jackson School of Geosciences Development Grant.

Institute for Geophysics, The University of Texas at Austin

Research support provided in start-up package for new research scientist.

Postdoctoral and Graduate Student Research

Support for postdoctoral research in the Princeton University/NOAA GFDL AOS Program
  • National Science Foundation Grant OCE-0327189 to Professor Jorge Sarmiento (provided partial salary support for last 2.5 years in Princeton).
  • National Science Foundation Grant OCE-0097316 to Professor Jorge Sarmiento (provided partial salary support for last 2.5 years in Princeton).
  • Ford Motor Company Carbon Mitigation Initiative Grant to Professor Jorge Sarmiento (provided partial salary support for last 2.5 years in Princeton).
  • AOS Program Visiting Scientist Award to Brian Arbic (provided salary support for first two years in Princeton).
Support for graduate student research in the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program
  • National Science Foundation Grant OCE-9617848 to Professor Glenn Flierl (provided partial salary support and tuition for last three years in Joint Program).
  • Office of Naval Research Grant N00014-95-1-0824 to Dr. James Price (provided partial salary support and tuition for last three years in Joint Program).
  • Office of Naval Research/National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship to Brian Arbic (provided salary support and tuition for first three years in Joint Program).